How you, too, can become a fabric addict (you're welcome).

FabricAddict

As you may have guessed, I love me some fabric! The love affair began during my quilting era years ago. Innocently enough, I began looking for fabric online. I found that I could go down a rabbit hole and be quite content ogling fabrics for a looooong time. It's still one of my go-to relaxation methods when I just want to veg and look at pretty things from time to time. Here are a couple of my favorite online fabric muses:  

First up is this great mom and pop shop based in NY state. They carry all sorts of fantastic fabric and the website has great search functionality. You can search by collection, designer, theme, and even color. In addition, the owner is an awesome and prolific fabric designer who creates some of the most beautiful fabric collections they carry. Her designs are digitally printed so you never have to worry about them running out of yardage. I'm particularly excited about Hawthorne Threads now offering all of her collections printed on canvas (in addition to lots of other fabric types), which is the BEST fabric for bag making.

This is my go-to resource for a lot of the fabric I use as lining for my bags.  If you buy a lot of yardage it reduces your cost; plus, free shipping on all domestic orders over $50. They also carry tons of designer fabric, have frequent sales, and the site also has great search functionality.  

This is another one of my favorite fabric shops. They carry a lot of Japanese fabric--need I say more? You can search by manufacturer, design, and style as well. They even have a separate "Japanese Import Fabric" section on their website. They also carry a large selection of other irresistible kawaii stuff. 

Speaking of Japanese fabric, what makes it so great, you ask? I'm a tactile person and a big fan of texture. I really like working with linen blends and love the often knobby texture and unbleached look of those fabrics, many of which are produced in Japan. My favorite fabrics to work with are also screen printed in Japan. You can watch a cool video here outlining both the fabric manufacture and printing process at the Japanese facilities used by one of my favorite U.S. fabric producers, Cotton + Steel. 

I hope this gets you started on your new vice of fabric ogling. Who doesn't need a new vice every now and again?!